Living Alone with Chronic Illness

Living with a chronic illness is hard.
It effects every aspect of your life – from eating and sleeping to getting out and socialising. Every day presents new issues and a continuation of the same old struggles that intrude on every minute that passes.
I am tired of being tired. I’m tired of being in pain, and tired of feeling like every single job to do is a mountain that is hard to climb.
Every task is broken into parts – parts that I never even knew existed before my condition deteriorated. Having a bath isn’t just having a bath; It consists of running it, finding a towel, turning it off, undressing, getting into the bath, washing my body, finding the energy to get out of the bath, drying myself, taking the plug out and dressing. This one small task that usually takes minutes for most has to be split into 10 different parts and usually takes me the best part of 2 hours. Whats is more is the exhaustion that follows this can knock me out for half a day or so.

Its hard to explain why you can’t manage to cook or do the washing up, but if every task has to be split into bight size chunks, the energy and time needed for this far exceeds any that I have in a day.

For this reason, living alone has its perks.
I don’t need to feel guilty that theres washing up on the side, or that some days I don’t have the energy to pick up the dog toys on the floor. I don’t need to explain why I can’t join in with the communal cleaning day, or that I would rather paying a cleaner thus looking lazy. I don’t need to worry that my washing stays in the machine a few extra hours before I manage to put it out to dry, or feel bad that I am not up for work like every normal person is.
In a lot of ways its done me good – but there are also some downsides.

Sometimes I am desperate for someone to chat to in the evenings, and someone to share the cooking with.
Eating is a challenge when its hard to cook, and the energy needed for the washing up doesn’t seem worth the effort. Sharing a meal gives food a purpose, and I am much more likely to cook if someone else is about.
The extra challenge is managing food when every time you eat you feel ill anyhow. I struggle to swallow properly, and often end up feeling horrifically full after just a few bights of food. Each day is different, and feels somewhat unpredictable. Some days I manage just fine, but other days even water comes back up, and often makes me choke.
For someone who used to be anorexic its a very hard thing to balance.

Seeing people day to day is also a big challenge. I go days without seeing anyone when I’ve crashed after doing too much, and this can really effect my mood. Loneliness is a common feature in many of us with chronic health conditions, and I have yet to find the answer to this. I have lost contact with many of my friends, and there are few that understand that most of the time people coming to mine is the only surefire way of seeing me.
I find it hard to meet new people. In a body that doesn’t look nor feel like mine, I am embarrassed to introduce myself. Walking around with a walking aid has dramatically shifted the way strangers react to me. No longer am I a ‘normal’ pedestrian – instead people stare and give me looks of sympathy. Those that have the guts to talk to me treat me like some poor young person who has had bad luck to deal with, but this interaction is rare.
I hate this part the most. I want to look and feel normal. I want to be back to the person I was before things went down hill – but I know that this is no longer possible.

Living alone is great most of the time, apart from when it isn’t.
I am lonely, the house is a mess, and most of the time my head is too foggy to function. Some days it doesn’t feel as great as it should.

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